Differential sensory-motor effects of pentobarbital in intact rats genetically selected for high vs. low neuropathic pain-related behaviour

Jean Jacques Vatine, Alexander Ratner, Denis Rosen, Ze'Ev Seltzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Denervation of the hindpaw in rodents triggers autotomy, a behaviour of licking, scratching and self-mutilation of the denervated paw. This behaviour has been used as a model of paraesthesia, dysaesthesia and neuropathic pain. HA and LA rats are lines that have been genetically selected for high or low levels of autotomy, respectively. Compared to intact LA rats, HA rats are more sensitive to convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a blocker of the chloride channel associated with the GABA(A) receptor. Here we tested whether an acute administration of a sedative but not anaesthetic dose of pentobarbital (PB) would differentiate between these rat lines, in a number of sensory and motor tests performed in intact rats. This drug was tested since in contrast to PTZ, PB enhances central nervous system (CNS) inhibition by increasing chloride Bur through the same channel. We found that PB was significantly more ataxic, antinociceptive, and reduced touch sensitivity in LA rats, compared to HA rats. These results suggest that HA and LA rats genetically differ in the levels of central inhibitions mediated by the GABA system presumably at the chloride channel. This difference may be associated with the dichotomous expression of neuropathic pain in these rat lines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-303
Number of pages9
JournalPain
Volume75
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1998
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • CNS inhibition
  • GABA system
  • Genetic predisposition
  • Motor behaviour
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Pentobarbital
  • Rat lines
  • Sensory testing

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