Differences in incident and recurrent myocardial infarction among White and Black individuals aged 35 to 84: Findings from the ARIC community surveillance study

Duygu Islek, Alvaro Alonso, Wayne Rosamond, Anna Kucharska-Newton, Yejin Mok, Kunihiro Matsushita, Silvia Koton, Michael Joseph Blaha, Mohammed K. Ali, Amita Manatunga, Viola Vaccarino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: No previous study has examined racial differences in recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a community population. We aimed to examine racial differences in recurrent AMI risk, along with first AMI risk in a community population. Methods: The community surveillance of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (2005-2014) included 470,000 people 35 to 84 years old in 4 U.S. communities. Hospitalizations for recurrent and first AMI were identified from ICD-9-CM discharge codes. Poisson regression models were used to compare recurrent and first AMI risk ratios between Black and White residents. Results: Recurrent and first AMI risk per 1,000 persons were 8.8 (95% CI, 8.3-9.2) and 20.7 (95% CI, 20.0-21.4) in Black men, 6.8 (95% CI, 6.5-7.0) and 14.1 (95% CI, 13.8-14.5) in White men, 5.3 (95% CI, 5.0-5.7) and 16.2 (95% CI, 15.6-16.8) in Black women, and 3.1 (95% CI, 3.0-3.3) and 8.8 (95% CI, 8.6-9.0) in White women, respectively. The age-adjusted risk ratios (RR) of recurrent AMI were higher in Black men vs White men (RR, 1.58 95% CI, 1.30-1.92) and Black women vs White women (RR, 2.09 95% CI, 1.64-2.66). The corresponding RRs were slightly lower for first AMI: Black men vs White men, RR, 1.49 (95% CI, 1.30-1.71) and Black women vs White women, RR, 1.65 (95% CI, 1.42-1.92) Conclusions: Large disparities exist by race for recurrent AMI risk in the community. The magnitude of disparities is stronger for recurrent events than for first events, and particularly among women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume253
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Community surveillance
  • Myocardial infarction outcomes
  • Racial differences
  • Racial disparities
  • Recurrent myocardial infarction
  • Risk

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Differences in incident and recurrent myocardial infarction among White and Black individuals aged 35 to 84: Findings from the ARIC community surveillance study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this