Dietary Energy Restriction Ameliorates Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

V. Rubovitch, A. Pharayra, M. Har-Even, O. Dvir, M. P. Mattson, C. G. Pick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common causes of neurological damage in young people. It was previously reported that dietary restriction, by either intermittent fasting (IF) or daily caloric restriction (CR), could protect neurons against dysfunction and degeneration in animal models of stroke and Parkinson’s disease. Recently, several studies have shown that the protein Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) plays a significant role in the induced neuroprotection following dietary restriction. In the present study, we found a significant reduction of SIRT1 levels in the cortex and hippocampus in a mouse model of mild weight-drop closed head TBI. This reduction was prevented in mice maintained on IF (alternate day fasting) and CR initiated after the head trauma. Hippocampus-dependent learning and memory (measured using a novel object recognition test) was impaired 30 days post-injury in mice fed ad libitum, but not in mice in the IF and CR groups. These results suggest a clinical potential for IF and/or CR as an intervention to reduce brain damage and improve functional outcome in TBI patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)613-621
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Molecular Neuroscience
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Axonal regeneration
  • Caloric restriction
  • Cognitive deficits
  • Intermittent fasting
  • Traumatic brain injury

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Dietary Energy Restriction Ameliorates Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Traumatic Brain Injury'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this