Detection of p53 protein in induced sputum after occupational exposure to crystalline silica

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the possibility of detecting p53 protein in the supernatant of induced sputum (IS) of workers exposed to crystalline silica. METHODS: Personal interviews were used to obtain demographic data, occupational and exposure histories, and health habits of the study participants. Sputum samples were collected from all subjects. RESULTS: The all-male study cohort included 35 workers (mean age 43.8 years) exposed to silica and 7 unexposed workers (34.7 years, P < 0.05). The mean duration of exposure was 13.4 years, and the range of exposure levels to silica was 0.02 to 0.33 ppm. The mean level of p53 protein was higher in the exposed group compared with in the unexposed group (76.47 pg/mL and 62.43 pg/mL, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: p53 may serve as a biomarker to identify workers at high risk for developing pulmonary malignancies. IS can detect p53 protein in sputum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)730-735
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume49
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

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