Detecting carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) carriage: Which body site should be cultured?

Amir Nutman*, Elizabeth Temkin, Jonathan Lellouche, Debby Ben David, David Schwartz, Yehuda Carmeli

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We compared the yield of culturing various body sites to detect carriage of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB). Culturing the skin using a premoistened sponge, with overnight enrichment and plating on CHROMagar MDR Acinetobacter, had the highest yield: 92%. Skin is satisfactory as a single site for active surveillance of CRAB.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)965-967
Number of pages3
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Detecting carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) carriage: Which body site should be cultured?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this