Design for a brain revisited: The neuromorphic design and functionality of the interactive space 'Ada'

Kynan Eng*, David Klein, Andreas Bäbler, Ulysses Bernardet, Mark Blanchard, Marcio Costa, Tobi Delbrück, Rodney J. Douglas, Klaus Hepp, Jonatas Manzolli, Matti Mintz, Fabian Roth, Ueli Rutishauser, Klaus Wassermann, Adrian M. Whatley, Aaron Wittmann, Reto Wyss, Paul F.M.J. Verschure

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

While much is now known about the operation and organisation of the brain at the neuronal and microcircuit level, we are still some way from understanding it as a complete system from the lowest to the highest levels of description. One way to gain such an integrative understanding of neural systems is to construct them. We have built the largest neuromorphic system yet known, an interactive space called 'Ada' that is able to interact with many people simultaneously using a wide variety of sensory and behavioural modalities. 'She' received 553,700 visitors over 5 months during the Swiss Expo.02 in 2002. In this paper we present the broad motivations, design and technologies behind Ada, and discuss the construction and analysis of the system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-180
Number of pages36
JournalReviews in the Neurosciences
Volume14
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Funding

FundersFunder number
Velux Stiftung
Gebert Rüf Stiftung
Universität Zürich

    Keywords

    • Behaviour selection
    • Emotion model
    • Neural networks
    • Neuromorphic
    • Robotics

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