Design disciplines and non-specific transfer

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Abstract

Computer science educators expect their students to develop a scientific design discipline with programs and proofs. Established acquisition of a scientific discipline encapsulates rich cognitive representation, which is reflected by competent non-specific transfer. Do computer science graduates demonstrate non-specific transfer of fundamental design notions? The study presented here reveals some undesired findings. Computer science graduates, who are engaged in teaching, showed rather limited competence with task representation and the heuristic of decomposition and (re-)composition, as well as with progression through ordered design stages. Many followed a rather unordered and unconvincing solution plan, which yielded only partial outcomes, and no conviction of exploitation. We describe our findings and offer suggestions for explicitly elaborating (sometime implicit) design notions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInformatics Education - Supporting Computational Thinking - Third International Conference on Informatics in Secondary Schools - Evolution and Perspectives, ISSEP 2008, Proceedings
Pages87-98
Number of pages12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event3rd International Conference on Informatics in Secondary Schools - Evolution and Perspective, ISSEP 2008 - Torun, Poland
Duration: 1 Jul 20084 Jul 2008

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume5090 LNCS
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference3rd International Conference on Informatics in Secondary Schools - Evolution and Perspective, ISSEP 2008
Country/TerritoryPoland
CityTorun
Period1/07/084/07/08

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