Deprenyl augmentation for treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia: A double-blind, controlled study

Tal Jungerman, David Rabinowttz, Ehud Klein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Augmentation of dopaminergic neurotransmission has been suggested as a treatment strategy for negative symptoms of schizophrenia. On the basis of open studies that reported the potential benefit of deprenyl (selegiline) as augmentation to antipsychotic treatment, this double-blind, controlled study was designed to further address this question. Sixteen schizophrenic patients with predominately negative symptoms, manifesting clinical stability on maintenance antipsychotic treatment, were randomly assigned to receive either deprenyl 15 mg/day or placebo in addition to their antipsychotic treatment for 8 weeks. Clinical follow-up and ratings were done during this period and for 8 more weeks after deprenyl discontinuation. Both groups showed a statistically significant but clinically marginal improvement over the 8 weeks of deprenyl or placebo treatment. This improvement was abolished during the postdiscontinuation follow-up period. Deprenyl at a dose of 15 mg/day did not offer therapeutic benefit in our patients. A significant placebo effect was observed, which may be the result of increased patient-doctor contact during the study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)522-525
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Deprenyl augmentation for treating negative symptoms of schizophrenia: A double-blind, controlled study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this