Decreased platelet vesicular monoamine transporter density in children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Paz Toren*, Moshe Rehavi, Anat Luski, Netta Roz, Nathaniel Laor, Michal Lask, Abraham Weizman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to assess vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) density in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a disorder involving monoaminergic dysregulation. It was hypothesized that the hypoactivity of monoaminergic neurotransmission related to ADHD could be associated with an under-expression of VMAT2. We assessed high affinity [3H] dihydrotetrabenazine [TBZOH] binding to platelet VMAT2 in untreated male ADHD children and adolescents (n=11) as compared to age-matched controls (n=14), as well as the correlation between VMAT2 density and the severity of ADHD symptoms as measured by the clinician-administered DSM-IV ADHD Scale (DAS) and the parent-administered Abbreviated Conners' Rating Scale (ACPRS). The [ 3H]TBZOH binding capacity (Bmax) was significantly lower (17%) in the ADHD group as compared to the controls. There was no difference between the two groups in the affinity (Kd value) of [3H]TBZOH to its binding site. An inverse correlation was found between the ADHD symptom scales and the Bmax values. It remains unclear whether the under-expression of platelet VMAT2 in ADHD children is reflective of a parallel change in the brain, and whether it is primary or an epiphenomenon of ADHD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-162
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Monoaminergic dysregulation
  • Platelet vesicular monoamine transporter density

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