Decline of Anopheles sergentii and Aedes caspius populations following presentation of attractive toxic (spinosad) sugar bait stations in an oasis.

Günter C. Müller, Vasiliy D. Kravchenko, Yosef Schlein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effect of attractive sugar bait stations, including sucrose, juice of nectarine, slow-release substances, preservatives, red food-dye marker, and the oral insecticide spinosad, on Anopheles sergentii and Aedes caspius populations was studied in a small oasis in a southern desert of Israel. Feeding on similar baits without an insecticide was monitored as a control in a similar neighboring oasis. The insecticide caused a drastic decrease in the number of mosquitoes. Compared to the control site, the An. sergentii population was reduced to less than a tenth and that of Ae. caspius declined to a third. The majority of the mosquitoes, 76.0% of An. sergentii females and 74.8% of Ae. caspius females, were marked by the food dye in the control site.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-149
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

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