Current challenges and opportunities in treating adult patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

Ofir Wolach*, Irina Amitai, Daniel J. DeAngelo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Significant advances have been made in recent years in the field of Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). New insights into the biology and genetics of ALL as well as novel clinical observations and new drugs are changing the way we diagnose, risk-stratify and treat adult patients with ALL. New genetic subtypes and alterations refine risk stratification and uncover new actionable therapeutic targets. The incorporation of more intensive, paediatric and paediatric-inspired approaches for young adults seem to have a positive impact on survival in this population. Minimal residual disease at different time points can assist in tailoring risk-adapted interventions for patients based on individual response. Finally, novel targeted approaches with monoclonal antibodies, immunotherapies and small molecules are moving through clinical development and entering the clinic. The aim of this review is to consolidate the abundance of emerging data and to review and revisit the concepts of risk-stratification, choice of induction and post-remission strategies as well as to discuss and update the approach to specific populations with ALL, such as young adult, elderly/unfit and relapsed/refractory patients with ALL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)705-723
Number of pages19
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume179
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Funding

FundersFunder number
AMGEN
Pfizer
Jazz Pharmaceuticals
Shire

    Keywords

    • Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukaemia
    • allogeneic transplantation
    • high-risk genetic subgroups
    • novel drugs
    • paediatric/paediatric inspired therapy

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