Culturally sensitive dance movement therapy for ultra-orthodox women: Group protocol targeting bodily and psychological self-perceptions

Gail Suskin, Michal Al-Yagon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explored a manual-based group intervention protocol for culturally sensitive short-term dance/movement therapy, as possibly contributing to bodily and psychological perceptions in a unique sample of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish women. The insulated, restrictive Ultra-Orthodox society prescribes distinct gender roles, modesty, and strong regulation of women's physical, sexual, and reproductive lives. Participants (N = 47) were ages 22–55 years (M = 33.32; SD = 7.75). Pre-post assessments included two body-perception measures (Body Appreciation Scale comprising positive body image; Body Investment Scale comprising body image, feelings and attitudes, body care, body protection and comfort in touch) and three psychological self-perception questionnaires (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale; Mental Health Inventory comprising psychological well-being and psychological distress; and “Big Five” Inventory). Overall, significant changes emerged in women's positive body image, body care, comfort in touch, psychological well-being, and conscientiousness personality trait. Discussion focused on in-depth examination of this protocol-based intervention's strategies and mechanisms that were both culturally appropriate and effective in facilitating body perceptions and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Article number101709
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalArts in Psychotherapy
Volume71
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Body perception
  • Culturally sensitive therapy for Ultra-Orthodox women
  • Manual-based dance/movement therapy protocol
  • Psychological self-perceptions
  • Short-term group intervention

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