Cultural identity of young deaf adults with cochlear implants in comparison to deaf without cochlear implants and hard-of-hearing young adults

Ester Goldblat, Tova Most

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the relationships between cultural identity, severity of hearing loss (HL), and the use of a cochlear implant (CI). One hundred and forty-one adolescents and young adults divided into three groups (deaf with CI, deaf without CI, and hard-of-hearing (HH)) and 134 parents participated. Adolescents and young adults completed questionnaires on cultural identity (hearing, Deaf, marginal, bicultural-hearing, and bicultural-deaf) and communication proficiencies (hearing, spoken language, and sign language). Parents completed a speech quality questionnaire. Deaf participants without CI and those with CI differed in all identities except marginal identity. CI users and HH participants had similar identities except for a stronger bicultural-deaf identity among CI users. Three clusters of participants evolved: participants with a dominant bicultural-deaf identity, participants with a dominant bicultural-hearing identity and participants without a formed cultural identity. Adolescents and young adults who were proficient in one of the modes of communication developed wellestablished bicultural identities. Adolescents and young adults who were not proficient in one of the modes of communication did not develop a distinguished cultural identity. These results suggest that communication proficiencies are crucial for developing defined identities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-239
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cultural identity of young deaf adults with cochlear implants in comparison to deaf without cochlear implants and hard-of-hearing young adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this