Crossed Anomic Aphasia: Mild Naming Deficits Following Right Brain Damage in a Dextral Patient

Uri Hadar, Stephanie Ticehurst, John P. Wade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A detailed case study is reported of crossed aphasia (CA) in a dextral patient, bearing upon such controversial issues as intrahemispheric localisation of language function and hemispheric reversal of nonverbal function. DA, a man aged 37, developed a mild naming problem due to right temporal lobe haematoma. Apart from a mild acquired stutter, his continuous speech was fluent and had a normal proportion of open to closed class lexical items. His naming deficit appears to originate in the ‘blocking’ or ‘disconnection’ of the phonological lexicon: he could usually give a functional definition of un-named items and retrieve them with the help of a phonemic cue. Lexical retrieval appears his only language deficit, as he had no comprehension or phonological discrimination deficits. DA showed no visuo-spatial or auditory-nonverbal deficits, suggesting the complete reversal of hemispheric specialisation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)459-468
Number of pages10
JournalCortex
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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