Corrigendum to: Sex determination, longevity, and the birth and death of reptilian species (Ecology and Evolution, 10.1002/ece3.2277)

Niv Sabath, Yuval Itescu, Anat Feldman, Shai Meiri, Itay Mayrose, Nicole Valenzuela

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

COEVOLUTION OF SDM AND L ONGEVITY Some errors were detected in the turtle longevity values reported in the Supplemental Data Table S1a (the corrected dataset can be found below). This mistaken dataset was used in the longevity analyses reported in the paper, such that some results and conclusions need to be corrected as follows. 1 After re-running the analyses using the corrected dataset, we found that the trend for greater lifespan evolution observed in TSD turtles compared to GSD turtles using the BM analysis is only statistically marginally significant (p = .087 instead of the reported p = .0005). Likewise, the trend of TSD turtles to evolve toward a higher lifespan optima than GSD turtles (36.0 and 19.6 years, respectively) is again marginal (p = .059 instead of the reported p = .018) (see Corrected Table 4 below). However, the direction of the trends themselves remains unchanged, namely the values of lifespan evolution and lifespan optimum are larger for TSD turtles than GSD turtles. These new results were robust to using alternative SDM assignment for species with mixed or equivocal SDM. 2 Consequently, the support for the hypothesis that longevity mediates TSD retention is qualitative (i.e., TSD turtles evolved toward greater values than GSD turtles) and not quantitative as reported in the manuscript (i.e., the trend of TSD turtles evolving toward greater values than GSD turtles is only marginally significant). The authors regret this error. (Table presented.).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7939
Number of pages1
JournalEcology and Evolution
Volume6
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2016

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Corrigendum to: Sex determination, longevity, and the birth and death of reptilian species (Ecology and Evolution, 10.1002/ece3.2277)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this