Correspondence in informational coping styles: How important is it for cancer patients and their spouses?

Sivia Barnoy, Yoram Bar-Tal, Bracha Zisser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the influence of correspondence in informational coping style (monitoring vs. blunting) on the psychological reaction of 98 married couples where one is a cancer patient and the other is the main caregiver. The effect of correspondence and the influence of role (caregiver vs. patient) and gender were analyzed. The results showed a different pattern by gender and role. For female patients, correspondence in monitoring with their spouse was associated with their better psychological reaction, while for male patients correspondence in blunting was associated with their better psychological reaction. No effects of monitoring or interaction of monitoring with gender were found with regards to the caregiver. However, correspondence in blunting was associated with the caregiver's worse psychological reaction. The different pattern obtained by gender and role showed that role and not information seeking style was the main factor to influence behavior. Additionally, correspondence in informational coping style does not always lead to a better psychological reaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-115
Number of pages11
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2006

Keywords

  • Cancer patients and their spouses
  • Correspondence in information seeking styles
  • Gender differences
  • Monitoring/blunting
  • Psychological distress
  • Role of caregiver
  • Role of patient
  • Well-being

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