Correlation of Suicidal and Violent Behavior in Different Diagnostic Categories in Hospitalized Adolescent Patients

ALAN APTER*, DORON GOTHELF, ISRAEL ORBACH, RONIT WEIZMAN, GIDON RATZONI, DOV HAR-EVEN, SAM TYANO

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

171 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine the relative importance of aggression and depression in adolescent suicide within different diagnostic categories. One hundred sixty-three consecutive admissions to an adolescent psychiatric inpatient unit were assessed using a semistructured diagnostic instrument, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children. Scores for depression, suicidal behaviors, and violent behaviors were calculated from this assessment. Anorexia nervosa and conduct disorder patients had the highest suicidal behavior scores. In addition, patients with conduct disorder were significantly more violent than patients with major depressive disorder, and scores on the Violent Behavior Scale correlated with suicidal symptoms but not with depressive symptoms. Conclusion: Aggression may be as important in some kinds of suicidal behaviors as is depression. Thus it seems that there are hypothetically at least two types of suicidal behaviors during adolescence: a wish to die (depression) and a wish not to be here for a time (impulse control). The first type of suicidal behavior characterizes that seen in disorders with prominent depression such as major depressive disorder and anorexia nervosa, and the second characterizes disorders of impulse control such as conduct disorder. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry, 1995, 34, 7:912–918.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-918
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Keywords

  • anorexia nervosa
  • conduct disorder
  • suicide
  • violence

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