Correlation between patient satisfaction with complete dentures and denture quality, oral condition, and flow rate of submandibular/sublingual salivary glands

Andy Wolff, Anil Gadre, Alfred Begleiter, David Moskona, Harold Cardash*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between patient satisfaction with complete dentures and parameters of denture quality, oral condition, and flow rate of the submandibular and sublingual salivary glands. Materials and Methods: The parameters were evaluated on 50 denture wearers using semiquantitative scales and a recently described submandibular/sublingual saliva collector. Results: Most patients had a medication-induced reduced salivary flow rate (mean 0.024 mL/min/gland; SD 0.040). Submandibular/sublingual salivary flow rate correlated statistically with six denture satisfaction parameters: maxillary denture retention and comfort, mandibular denture retention and comfort, abilities of chewing, and speech. Residual alveolar ridge resilience, maxillary ridge shape, and denture quality did not significantly correlate with denture satisfaction. Characteristics of musculature correlated significantly only with subjective maxillary denture retention, and mandibular ridge shape correlated with comfort. Conclusion: Submandibular/sublingual salivary flow rate is an important factor in denture satisfaction. The retention of the maxillary denture was correlated to the oral musculature characteristics, and the mandibular denture comfort was correlated to the mandibular ridge shape. Denture satisfaction was not affected by other anatomic or denture quality-related parameters.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-48
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Prosthodontics
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2003

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