Coronary angiography in the elderly with acute myocardial infarction

David Harpaz*, Yoseph Rozenman, Solomon Behar, Valentina Boyko, Lori Mandelzweig, Shmuel Gottlieb

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Despite the high mortality rate in elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), the value of coronary angiography (CA) in the elderly has been questioned due to a less favorable outcome. The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic significance of CA on mortality of elderly patients AMI in "real world" practice. Methods: The study cohort comprised 1009 elderly (age ≥ 75 years) patients with AMI who were derived from three prospective national surveys between 1996 and 2000 in all 25 CCUs operating in Israel. Baseline characteristics, hospital course, management and outcome of 274 (27%) elderly patients who underwent CA during the index hospitalization were compared with 735 (73%) counterpart patients who did not. Results: Patients who underwent CA were on average 2.2 years younger, and were more often with hyperlipidemia (p < 0.0001 for each) and with a history of previous percutaneous coronary intervention (p < 0.03) than the control group. They had a more favorable clinical presentation: a higher systolic blood pressure (p < 0.04), a better Killip class (p < 0.03) and an increased frequency of non-Q wave MI (p < 0.03). They developed more often recurrent MI (p = 0.002) and re-ischemia (p < 0.0001). Variables associated with CA use during the index hospitalization were re-infarction, re-ischemia, the year of the index AMI and the availability of an on-site a catheterization laboratory in the hospital, while a higher age and fibrinolytic therapy decreased the likelihood of CA use. Of the patients who underwent CA, 67% underwent coronary revascularization (either PCI and/or CABG). Crude and adjusted mortality rates at 1 year were significantly lower in patients who underwent CA, as compared to counterparts who did not: 21% vs. 37.3%, respectively (p < 0.0001), hazard ratio = 0.52 (95% confidence interval 0.38-0.71). The benefit of CA was noted in a wide range of subgroups analyzed. Conclusions: In "real world" practice, elderly patients with AMI who undergo CA during hospitalization have a better prognosis at 1 year. Age alone should not be a deterrent to performing CA in elderly patients with AMI. Further large randomized trials are needed to confirm that an invasive approach is beneficial in high-risk elderly patients with AMI. Condensed abstract: To determine the prognostic significance of coronary angiography (CA) during the course of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in "real world" practice on mortality of elderly patients, 1009 such patients were studied. Re-infarction, re-ischemia, the year of the index AMI and the availability of an on-site a Cath. Lab. were variables which increased the likelihood of undergoing CA, while a higher age and fibrinolytic therapy decreased this likelihood. The crude and covariate adjusted mortality rates at 1 year were significantly lower in patients who underwent CA in comparison to counterparts who did not: 21% vs. 37.3%, respectively (p < 0.0001), hazard ratio 0.52 (95% confidence interval 0.38-0.71). The benefit of CA was noted across a wide range of subgroups analyzed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-256
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 20 Mar 2007

Keywords

  • Acute myocardial infarction
  • Coronary angiography
  • Elderly
  • Mortality

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