Coral recruitment to the reefs of Eilat, Red Sea: Temporal and spatial variation, and possible effects of anthropogenic disturbances

Avigdor Abelson, Ronen Olinky, Steve Gaines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The accelerating deterioration of the coral reefs of Eilat has raised debate over the exact causes and how they affect the reefs. The hypothesis of the present study was that a low recruitment rate of reef-building coral species may play an important role in the decline of the Eilat reefs. Our goal was to assess spatial and temporal recruitment patterns in Eilat, focusing on examining the possible impact of human activities. The results of coral recruitment to 10 series of ceramic tiles on metal racks, revealed very low overall recruitment relative to other geographical regions. In addition, we found that recruitment rates and recruit survival were lowest at sites closest to the major eutrophication sources in Eilat. The low recruitment rates may be chronically too low to compensate for the elevated coral mortality rates of recent years. The significant differences between the present study and a similar study carried out during the same period using a different method, emphasize the crucial need for a standardized method for recruitment assessment in coral reefs worldwide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)576-582
Number of pages7
JournalMarine Pollution Bulletin
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2005

Keywords

  • Coral reefs
  • Eilat
  • Larvae
  • Pollution
  • Recruitment
  • Red Sea

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Coral recruitment to the reefs of Eilat, Red Sea: Temporal and spatial variation, and possible effects of anthropogenic disturbances'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this