Coping with additional stresses: Comparative study of healthy and cancer patient new immigrants

Lea Baider, Bella Kaufman, Penina Ever-Hadani, Atara Kaplan De-Nour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The adjustment and psychological distress of 166 cancer patients, who are new immigrants from the former Soviet Union, was assessed and compared to that of 288 healthy new immigrants from the former Soviet Union. The healthy new immigrants had many adjustment problems and their psychological distress was fairly high. The cancer patients reported extremely severe psychological distress. In the healthy immigrants, age contributed to distress while family support had significant protective effects especially in the male immigrants. In the patients, these differences were even more extreme with family support being protective in the male group but not in the female group. Intrusiveness (IES) seems to be maladaptive adding to distress. The results clearly indicate that additional stresses, such as immigration, make cancer patients more vulnerable. The results also suggest possible interventions, especially those that will help to decrease intrusiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1077-1084
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume42
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Healthy population
  • Immigration
  • Stress

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