Continuous intravenous octreotide treatment for acute experimental pancreatitis

R. Greenberg, R. Haddad, H. Kashtan, E. Brazowski, E. Graff, Y. Skornick, Ofer Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. The efficacy of octreotide, the synthetic analogue of the hormone somatostatin, for the treatment of acute pancreatitis is controversial. Octreotide has been commonly administered in subcutaneous bolus injections; however, continuous intravenous infusion may be advantageous for acute conditions. Methods: Acute experimental pancreatitis was induced in rats by intraparenchymal injections of 1 ml 10% sodium taurocholate, and octreotide (1 μg/kg/h, dissolved in physiological solution, intravenously was started 4 h later and continuously infused for 48 h. Physiological solution infusions, in identical volumes, were used in the controls. The following parameters were examined: mortality; macroscopic and histological damage; hematocrit; plasma pH; acid-base balance; serum glucose; calcium, and amylase. Results: Octreotide treatment had a striking effect on mortality: 8.3 versus 91.6% in the treatment and control groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Octreotide also ameliorated pancreatic edema and intestinal dilatation, and had significant beneficial effects on histopathological damage and the biochemical alterations which are associated with acute pancreatitis. Conclusions: Continuous intravenous octreotide infusion is a potentially efficacious therapeutic method for acute pancreatitis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalDigestion
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

Keywords

  • Experimental pancreatitis
  • Intravenous treatment
  • Octreotide

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