Continuity and Change: Animal Economies of Jerusalem and its Hinterland during the Persian and Hellenistic Periods

Abra Spiciarich, Yuval Gadot, Yiftah Shalev, Oded Lipschits, Binyamin Har-Even, Lidar Sapir Hen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The animal economy of Jerusalem in the wake of the Neo-Babylonian destruction and reestablishment of the city in the 6th through the 2nd cent. B.C.E. is relatively unknown. This paper presents the first diachronic perspective of Jerusalem and its hinterland’s animal economy in the latter half of the 1st mill. B.C.E., against the backdrop of geopolitical, environmental, and cultural changes. To accomplish this aim, we carried out a synchronic and diachronic study of the faunal assemblages from two sites dated to this time frame: Giv ati Parking Lot (Area 10) in Jerusalem and Nebi Samuel in the hinterland. Further, we studied these sites in the context of previously published contemporary sites. We demonstrate that Jerusalem continued to butcher locally and consume livestock acquired through direct and indirect channels in both periods. At the same time, those in the hinterland continued to produce meat and agropastoral products for themselves and external consumers. Additional conclusions of this research indicate that while there is continuity in the herd management practices of sheep and goats in Jerusalem and its hinterland, there is an evident change in the exploitation of cattle and chicken. We suggest that these changes relate to social, cultural, and religious developments in the latter half of the 1st mill. B.C.E.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-217
JournalZeitschrift des Deutschen Palastina-Vereins
Volume139
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2023

Keywords

  • Urban-rural
  • Southern Levant
  • animal economy
  • consumers-producers
  • Jerusalem

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