Complete atrioventricular block complicating inferior acute wall myocardial infarction: Short- and long-term prognosis

Solomon Behar, Eliahu Zissman, Monty Zion, Uri Goldbourt, Henrietta Reicher-Reiss, Yoseph Shalev, Hanoch Hod, Elieser Kaplinsky, Avraham Caspi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The incidence of complete atrioventricular block (AVB) in a large group of patients with Q-wave inferior acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was 251 (11%) of 2273 patients. This incedence was significantly higher in women (14%) and patients >70 years old (15%) than in men and patients <70 years old (10% and 9%, respectively). Patients with complete AVB exhibited more serious arrhythmic and mechanical complications during hospitalization and included more patients with very high enzyme levels than their counterparts without AVB. The in-hospital mortality rate was 92 (37%) of 251 patients with complete AVB versus 200 (11%) of 1890 in those without AVB (p < 0.0001). After adjustment for age, gender, and important anamnestic, medical, and enzymatic findings, complete AVB emerged as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality, yielding an odds ratio of 2.0 (90% confidence interval 1.12 to 3.57). The long-term (5-year) mortality rate in hospital survivors was slightly but not significantly higher in patients with complete AVB (28%) during hospitalization than in their counterparts with no AVB (23%). In view of these data, patients with inferior AMI in whom complete AVB develops are at increased risk and may benefit from urgent revascularization; the postdischarge management of survivors with complete AVB should be no different from that of patients without AVB.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1622-1627
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume125
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Complete atrioventricular block complicating inferior acute wall myocardial infarction: Short- and long-term prognosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this