Comparison of two patient-controlled analgesia techniques on neuropsychological functioning in the immediate postoperative period

Benzion Beilin, Dan Hoofien, Ravit Poran, Inbal Gral, Galina Grinevich, Berta Butin, Eduard Mayburd, Yehuda Shavit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pain may contribute to cognitive decline, which is a common complication in the early postoperative period. We compared the effects of two common pain management techniques, intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA-IV) and patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA), on cognitive functioning in the immediate postoperative period. Patients hospitalized for elective surgery were randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups (30 patients per group). A battery of objective, standardized neuropsychological tests was administered preoperatively and 24 hours after surgery. Pain intensity was also evaluated. Nonoperated volunteers served as controls. Patients of the PCA-IV group exhibited significantly higher pain scores than did patients of the PCEA group. PCA-IV patients exhibited significant deterioration in the postoperative period in all the neuropsychological measures, while the PCEA patients exhibited significant deterioration only in one cognitive index, compared to controls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)674-682
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • Local anaesthetics
  • Opiates
  • PCA-IV
  • PCEA
  • Postoperative pain

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