Comparison of Triggering and Nontriggering Factors in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Extent of Coronary Arterial Narrowing

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Abstract

Various physical, emotional, and extrinsic triggers have been attributed to acute coronary syndrome. Whether a correlation can be drawn between identifiable ischemic triggers and the nature of coronary artery disease (CAD) still remains unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the correlation between triggered versus nontriggered ischemic symptoms and the extent of CAD in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We conducted a retrospective, single-center observational study including 1,345 consecutive patients with STEMI, treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Acute physical and emotional triggers were identified in patients' historical data. Independent predictors of multivessel CAD were determined using a logistic regression model. A potential trigger was identified in 37% of patients. Physical exertion was found to be the most dominant trigger (65%) followed by psychological stress (16%) and acute illness (12%). Patients with nontriggered STEMI tended to be older and more likely to have co-morbidities. Patients with nontriggered STEMI showed a higher rate of multivessel CAD (73% vs 30%, p <0.001). In a multivariate regression model, nontriggered symptoms emerged as an independent predictor of multivessel CAD (odds ratio 8.33, 95% CI 5.74 to 12.5, p = 0.001). No specific trigger was found to predict independently the extent of CAD. In conclusion, symptoms onset without a recognizable trigger is associated with multivessel CAD in STEMI. Further studies will be required to elucidate the putative mechanisms underlying ischemic triggering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1219-1223
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume117
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Apr 2016

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