Comparison of Myocardial Reperfusion in Patients With Fasting Blood Glucose ≤100, 101 to 125, and >125 mg/dl and ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction With Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

Paul Fefer, Hanoch Hod, Jacob Ilany, Michael Shechter, Amit Segev, Ilia Novikov, Victor Guetta, Shlomi Matetzky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (FG) were associated with worse outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI). Because the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear, 376 consecutive patients with ST-elevation MI who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) were investigated. Patients were divided into 3 groups based on FG ≤100, FG of 101 to 125, and FG >125 mg/dl or previously diagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) and studied for electrocardiographic signs of myocardial reperfusion (both spontaneous and after PPCI) and clinical outcomes. Clinical reperfusion was less likely with increasing FG: FG ≤100 mg/dl, 26%; FG of 101 to 125, 19%; and FG >125 and/or DM, 16% (p for trend = 0.03). Accordingly, angiographic TIMI grade 3 flow on initial angiography was 22% for FG ≤100 mg/dl, 13% for FG of 101 to 125, and 14% for FG >125 and/or DM (p for trend = 0.05). Despite similar TIMI flow after PPCI, early ST-segment resolution (≥70%) was noted in 76%, 63%, and 60% in patients with FG ≤100 mg/dl, FG of 101 to 125, and FG >125 and/or DM, respectively (p for trend <0.01). Peak creatine phosphokinase (CPK) increased gradually, whereas left ventricular ejection fraction decreased with increased FG. Worse outcomes were observed with increasingly higher FG for heart failure (9%, 23%, and 26%; p for trend <0.01), cardiogenic shock (5%, 7%, and 13%; p for trend = 0.02), in-hospital mortality (1%, 2%, and 6%; p for trend = 0.01), and long-term mortality (2.5%, 4.5%, and 12%; p for trend <0.01) for patients with FG ≤100 mg/dl, FG of 101 to 125, and FG >125 and/or DM, respectively. In conclusion, increased FG and previously diagnosed DM were associated with less spontaneous reperfusion and less myocardial reperfusion after PPCI, resulting in worse clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1457-1462
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume102
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2008
Externally publishedYes

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