Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain

M. Shapiro, R. Simantov, M. Yair, M. Leitman, A. Blatt, E. Scapa, E. Broide

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) causes a wide range of symptoms. Some patients present with typical symptoms such as heartburn and regurgitation and others with atypical symptoms such as chest pain. The mechanism responsible for the varying clinical presentation of GERD is still not fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in central and local intraesophageal factors between patients with typical GERD symptoms and those with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP). Patients presenting with typical and atypical symptoms suspicious of GERD underwent upper endoscopy and 24-hour pH monitoring with four sensors, each positioned at a different esophageal level. All patients completed GERD symptom, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and Symptom Stress Rating questionnaires. From January 2006 to December 2009, 50 patients were recruited, 29 with typical symptoms, and 21 with NCCP. Patients with proven GERD and NCCP had higher proximal extension of acid during reflux episodes than patients with typical symptoms. They were found to be older, had a shorter history of symptom onset, worse anxiety scores, and more endoscopic findings compatible with gastritis. Proximal extension of acid during the reflux episodes in patients with GERD presenting with NCCP may play a role in symptom generation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)702-708
Number of pages7
JournalDiseases of the Esophagus
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Keywords

  • Acid extension
  • Anxiety
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Noncardiac chest pain
  • Symptom

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Comparison of central and intraesophageal factors between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients and those with GERD-related noncardiac chest pain'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this