Comparison of 18-Month Outcomes of Ambulatory Patients With Reduced (≤40%) Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Treated in a Community-Based, Dedicated Heart Failure Clinic Versus Treated Elsewhere

Daniel Murninkas, Osnat Itzhaki Ben Zadok, Zaza Iakobishvili, Henri Jino, Ester Yohananov, Shlomo Birkenfeld, David Hasdai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We sought to examine the management and outcomes of ambulatory patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction in a community-based, dedicated clinic. Patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤40% were actively solicited to attend a community-based, dedicated clinic. Eligible patients who chose to decline constituted our control group. Of 552 patients with LVEF ≤40% (median age 73 years and median LVEF 35%), 304 (55%) agreed to attend the clinic. Patients with worse New York Heart Association class were more likely to attend the clinic (odds ratio 2.07 [1.45, 2.95], p <0.001), whereas women were more likely to decline (odds ratio 0.63 [0.42, 0.93], p <0.022). During 18 months of follow-up, patients in the dedicated clinic significantly improved their functional capacity (56% New York Heart Association 3 to 4 at baseline vs 27% at follow-up, p <0.001) and LVEF (35% [interquartile range 25, 35] at baseline vs 35% (interquartile range 30, 40) at follow-up, p <0.001). In comparison with patients managed routinely, patients treated in a dedicated clinic achieved better guideline-recommended pharmacological treatment (65% vs 85% receiving β blockers, p <0.001, 65% vs 82% receiving renin-angiotensin inhibitors, p = 0.0006, 31% vs 45% receiving mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, p <0.001). During follow-up, electrical device implantation was similar (6% vs 7% of dedicated-HF-clinic patients, p = 0.700). Furthermore, overall survival was better in patients treated in the clinic (log rank p = 0.0006), even after censoring the first 4 months to account for potential bias (log rank p = 0.0232). In conclusion, management in a community-based, dedicated clinic compared with routine management was associated with augmented guideline-recommended treatment and improved survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1101-1108
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume123
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2019

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