Cohesin-dockerin interaction in cellulosome assembly: A single hydroxyl group of a dockerin domain distinguishes between nonrecognition and high affinity recognition

Adva Mechaly, Henri Pierre Fierobe, Anne Belaich, Jean Pierre Belaich, Raphael Lamed, Yuval Shoham, Edward A. Bayer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The assembly of enzyme components into the cellulosome complex is dictated by the cohesin-dockerin interaction. In a recent article (Mechaly, A., Yaron, S., Lamed, R., Fierobe, H.-P., Belaich, A., Belaich, J.-P., Shoham, Y., and Bayer, E. A. (2000) Proteins 39, 170-177), we provided experimental evidence that four previously predicted dockerin residues play a decisive role in the specificity of this high affinity interaction, although additional residues were also implicated. In the present communication, we examine further the contributing factors for the recognition of a dockerin by a cohesin domain between the respective cellulosomal systems of Clostridium thermocellum and Clostridium cellulolyticum. In this context, the four confirmed residues were analyzed for their individual effect on selectivity. In addition, other dockerin residues were discerned that could conceivably contribute to the interaction, and the suspected residues were similarly modified by site-directed mutagenesis. The results indicate that mutation of a single residue from threonine to leucine at a given position of the C. thermocellum dockerin differentiates between its nonrecognition and high affinity recognition (Kα ∼ 109 M-1) by a cohesin from C. cellulolyticum. This suggests that the presence or absence of a single decisive hydroxyl group is critical to the observed biorecognition. This study further implicates additional residues as secondary determinants in the specificity of interaction, because interconversion of selected residues reduced intraspecies self-recognition by at least three orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, as the latter mutageneses served to reduce but not annul the cohesin-dockerin interaction within this species, it follows that other subtle alterations play a comparatively minor role in the recognition between these two modules.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9883-9888
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume276
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Mar 2001

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