COCHLEAR IMPLANTATION IN ELDERLY INDIVIDUALS: INSIGHTS BASED ON A RETROSPECTIVE EVALUATION

Michal Luntz, Noam Yehudai, Tova Most, Talma Shpak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: In old age, the typical decline in temporal processing, auditory memory, speed of information processing, and ability to filter out irrelevant competing auditory input lead to deterioration in speech perception. This thereby broadens the target population for cochlear implantation among elderly individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss. These features also raise concern regarding cochlear implant (CI) fitting and outcomes.

AIM: To establish expectations from CI in older individuals.

METHODS: This is a retrospective case review of 20 individuals with severe or severe-to-profound hearing loss, aged 60 or older (mean, 66.6 ± 5.25; range, 60-81 at the time of CI. Evaluation included speech-perception tests and the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) for testing quality of life.

RESULTS: Between pre- and post-implantation, mean group values improved from 18.6% to 55.5%, from 37.2% to 84.5%, and from 11.2% to 60.5%, respectively, on the above speech-perception tests. No major postoperative complications were observed. The device was used consistently by all but one patient. GBI revealed improvement on all subscales.

CONCLUSIONS: After implantation speech perception improved, there were no major post-CI complications, and post-implantation vertigo was less significant than expected in this age group. These results diminish concerns regarding CI in elderly individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)761-5, 805
JournalHarefuah
Volume154
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2015

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