Closure of incision in cataract surgery in-vivo using a temperature controlled laser soldering system based on a 1.9μm semiconductor laser

Ilan Gabay, Svetlana Basov, David Varssano, Irina Barequet, Mordechai Rosner, Marcel Rattunde, Joachim Wagner, Max Platkov, Mickey Harlev, Uri Rossman, Abraham Katzir

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

In phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery, a corneal incision is made and is then closed by hydration of the wound lips, or by suturing. We developed a system for sealing such an incision by soldering with a semiconductor disk laser (λ=1.9μm), under close temperature control. The goal was to obtain stronger and more watertight adhesion. The system was tested on incisions in the corneas of 15 eyes of pigs, in-vivo. Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT) and histopathologic examination showed little thermal damage and good apposition. The measured average burst pressure was 1000±30mmHg. In the future, this method wound may replace suturing of corneal wounds, including in traumatic corneal laceration and corneal transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XVI
EditorsIsrael Gannot
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781628419368
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016
EventOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XVI - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 13 Feb 201614 Feb 2016

Publication series

NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume9702
ISSN (Print)1605-7422

Conference

ConferenceOptical Fibers and Sensors for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment Applications XVI
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period13/02/1614/02/16

Keywords

  • cataract surgery
  • cornea
  • in-vivo
  • laser soldering
  • pigs
  • semiconductor disk laser
  • temperature-control

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