Clinically significant high-grade av block as a reversible cause for acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients—a propensity score matched cohort

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Abstract

Background. High-grade AV block (HGAVB) is a life-threatening condition. Acute kidney injury (AKI) which is usually caused by renal hypo-perfusion is associated with adverse outcomes. We aimed to investigate the association between AKI and HGAVB. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort comparing the incidence of AKI among patients with HGAVB requiring pacemaker implantation compared with propensity score matched controls. Primary outcome was the incidence of AKI at admission. Secondary outcomes were change in creatinine levels, AKI during stay, recovery from AKI, mortality and major adverse kidney events (MAKE). Results. In total, 80 HGAVB patients were compared to 400 controls. HGAVB patients had a higher proportion of admission AKI compared to controls (36.2% versus 21.1%, RR = 1.71 [1.21–2.41], p = 0.004). Creatinine changes from baseline to admission and to maximum during hospitalization, were also higher in HGAVB (p = 0.042 and p = 0.033). Recovery from AKI was more frequent among HGAVB patients (55.2% vs. 25.9%, RR = 2.13 [1.31–3.47], p = 0.004) with hospitalization time, MAKE and crude mortality similar (p > 0.158). Conclusions. AKI occurs in about one third of patients admitted with HGAVB, more frequent compared to controls. Patients with AKI accompanying HGAVB were likelier to recover from AKI. Further studies to explore this relationship could aid in clinical decision making for HGAVB patients.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2424
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acute kidney injury
  • Atrio-ventricular block
  • Pacemaker implantation
  • Symptomatic brady-cardia

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