Clinical presentation can predict disease course in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

Nir Lubezky*, Menahem Ben-Haim, Richard Nakache, Guy Lahat, Arye Blachar, Eli Brazowski, Erwin Santo, Joseph M. Klausner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Preoperative diagnosis of malignancy within intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN) solely by clinical or radiological findings is not always possible. We sought a correlation between preoperative clinico-radiological findings and outcome. Methods: A prospective database of pancreatic resections for IPMN (2002-2008) and a retrospective pathological revision of all pancreatic cancer specimens (1995-2001) were analyzed. The patients were grouped into asymptomatic with preoperative diagnosis of IPMN (group 1), symptomatic with a preoperative diagnosis of IPMN (group 2), and those with a preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic cancer whose specimen revealed a background of IPMN (group 3). The groups were compared for demographics, clinical presentation, pathological findings, and outcome. Results: Of the 62 patients with IPMN, 19 were in group 1, 23 in group 2, and 20 in group 3. Their median age (range) was 65.6 (46-80), 67 (50-84), and 73.4 (57-86) years, respectively. The clinical presentation for groups 2 and 3 included abdominal pain (56% vs. 32 %), weight loss (8% vs. 52%), obstructive jaundice (4% vs. 57%), pancreatitis (22% and 5%), and new onset of diabetes (14% and 44%). Invasive cancer was found in one patient in group 1 (5.2%), two patients in group 2 (8.7%), and all patients in group 3. IPMN was present in 23 of 217 (10.6%) of all resected pancreatic cancer specimens. Five year survival for patients with invasive disease was 47% and 92% for patients with noninvasive disease (mean follow-up 37.6 months). Conclusions: Benign IPMN can usually be differentiated from adenocarcinoma preoperatively. The clinical presentation is highly indicative of disease course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)126-132
Number of pages7
JournalWorld Journal of Surgery
Volume34
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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