Clinical Correlates and Outcome of Major Depressive Disorder and Comorbid Migraine: A Report of the European Group for the Study of Resistant Depression

Gernot Fugger, Markus Dold, Lucie Bartova, Marleen M.M. Mitschek, Daniel Souery, Julien Mendlewicz, Alessandro Serretti, Joseph Zohar, Stuart Montgomery, Chiara Fabbri, Richard Frey, Siegfried Kasper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The present multicenter study aimed at defining the clinical profile of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and comorbid migraine. Methods: Demographic and clinical information for 1410 MDD patients with vs without concurrent migraine were compared by descriptive statistics, analyses of covariance, and binary logistic regression analyses. Results: The point prevalence rate for comorbid migraine was 13.5% for female and 6.2% for male patients. MDD + migraine patients were significantly younger, heavier, more likely female, of non-Caucasian origin, outpatient, and suffering from asthma. The presence of MDD + migraine resulted in a significantly higher functional disability. First-line antidepressant treatment strategy revealed a trend towards agomelatine. Second-generation antipsychotics were significantly less often administered for augmentation treatment in migraineurs. Overall, MDD + migraine patients tended to respond worse to their pharmacotherapy. Conclusion: Treatment guidelines for comorbid depression and migraine are warranted to ensure optimal efficacy and avoid possible pitfalls in psychopharmacotherapy, including serotonin syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-577
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Major depressive disorder
  • clinical aspects
  • migraine

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