Clinical and economic consequences of volume- or time-dependent intermittent catheterization in patients with spinal cord lesions and neuropathic bladder

T. Polliack, V. Bluvshtein, O. Philo, J. Ronen, I. Gelernter, Z. P. Luttwak, J. Hart, A. Catz*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study design: Open comparative study. Objective: To compare the impact of volume-dependent intermittent catheterization (VDIC) and time-dependent intermittent catheterization (TDIC) on financial burden and clinical outcomes in patients with spinal cord lesions (SCL). Setting: Department of Spinal Rehabilitation, Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital, Israel. Method: Economic and clinical outcomes were examined in 13 SCL patients treated with VDIC following bladder volume measurement by a portable ultrasound device (the study group), and in 11 patients treated with TDIC (the control group). Patients were followed for 12-30 days. Costs were calculated according to December 2003 prices at Loewenstein Hospital. The t-test and the Fisher's Exact Test were employed for comparisons between the groups. Results: The number of catheterizations per patient per day, the time required to perform volume measurements and catheterizations, and their total cost, were approximately 44, 49, and 46% lower in the study group than in the control group. SCIMU (representing bladder management functioning) increased during the study in both groups, and the increase was 31% higher in the study group than in the control group. Urinary infection was found in three patients in the control group and in none in the study group. Conclusion: VDIC has economic and probably also clinical advantages over TDIC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-619
Number of pages5
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005

Funding

FundersFunder number
Ministry of Defense

    Keywords

    • Economic consequences
    • Outcomes
    • Spinal cord lesions
    • Time-dependent intermittent catheterization
    • Volume-dependent intermittent catheterization

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