Cholesterol-lowering effects of a 10 mg daily dose of lovastatin in patients with initial total cholesterol levels 200 to 240 mg/dl (5.18 to 6.21 mmol/liter)

Ardon Rubinstein, Yoav Lurie, Itamar Groskop, Moshe Weintrob

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Subjects with plasma cholesterol levels >240 mg/dl (6.21 mmol/liter) and those with >200 mg/dl (5.18 mmol/liter) who have coronary artery disease, or those with 2 risk factors for ischemic heart disease who do not respond to a hypocholesterolemic diet should all be treated. Lovastatin, which is an inhibitor of hydroxymethygluteryl coenzyme A reductase, is a new agent for treating hypercholesterolemia and is administered in a dose of 20 to 80 mg/day. A study was conducted in which only 10 mg of lovastatin was given to 28 subjects with plasma cholesterol of 200 to 240 mg/dl (5.18 to 6.21 mmol/liter). Cholesterol plasma levels decreased in 19% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 24% from baseline levels after 20 weeks of treatment. All 28 patients decreased their cholesterol values to <200 mg% (5.18 mmol/liter), and only 1 had a low-density lipoprotein level >130 mg% (3.36 mmol/liter) at termination of the study. Achievement of desirable values of cholesterol with 10 mg of lovastatin was accompanied by less adverse effects and with significant financial saving. The calculated saving for lovastatin consumers in the USA could be an amount of $60,000,000. Thus, it is recommended that this drug be manufactured in 10 mg tablets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1123-1126
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume68
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 1991

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