Children discharged from an emergency department with bacteraemia had lower C-reactive protein and better outcomes than admissions

Renana Gelernter, Tsilia Lazarovitch, Eran Kozer, Ilan Youngster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To investigate whether there are common clinical findings in bacteraemic children that were discharged from the emergency department (ED) and to follow their clinical outcome. Methods: A retrospective chart review of children above one-month-old with positive blood cultures obtained in Shamir Medical Center's ED between January 2011 and December 2019 was conducted. Results: A total of 250 cases were analysed, of which 68 discharged after first evaluation. Streptococcus pneumonia was the most commonly isolated pathogen. Compared to children that were admitted when first evaluated in the ED, discharged children had lower C-reactive protein (mean 50.5 ± 62.8 vs 121.7 ± 113.2 mg/L, p < 0.001). Dyspnoea and being ill-looking were less prevalent among the latter (6.7% versus 35.1%, p = <0.001, 3.0% versus 22.2% p < 0.001, respectively), as were presence of Kingella kingae and other Gram-negative bacteria. Of the children hospitalised in our institution, the duration of hospitalisation was significantly lower than in those admitted during the first visit (6.3 ± 4.3 vs 9.0 ± 7.4 days, p =.002). None of the discharged children were admitted to paediatric intensive care unit. Conclusion: Children with bacteraemia who were discharged home before knowing their positive blood cultures results had lower C-reactive protein and better outcome compared to those admitted on first evaluation in emergency department.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1571-1576
Number of pages6
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume110
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • bacterial infection
  • blood cultures
  • fever
  • paediatric emergency department

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