Chemical and thyroid hormone profile of the bone marrow interstitial fluid in hematologic disorders and patients without primary hematologic disorders

Eilon Krashin, Martin Ellis, Keren Cohen, Maya Viner, Eran Neumark, Gloria Rashid, Osnat Ashur-Fabian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Bone marrow interstitial fluid (BMIF) has not been well characterized. BMIF was isolated from 60 patients including plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD, n = 33), other primary hematologic disorders (OHD, n = 15), and patients with secondary or nonhemtologic disorders (NHD, n = 12) and analyzed for an array of chemical constituents. These included total cholesterol, glucose, phosphate, creatinine, urea, total protein, albumin, globulins, total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, sodium, osmolarity, free triiodothyronine (free T3), total triiodothyronine (total T3), and free tetraiodothyronine (free T4). Levels of BMIF components were compared between patient groups and to plasma levels. Compared with plasma, total cholesterol, total protein, total bilirubin, sodium, and calculated osmolarity were lower in BMIF in all groups (P < 0.05). Calculated globulins and aspartate aminotransferase were lower in BMIF of PCD patients and patients with NHD. Albumin was lower in BMIF of patients with PCD and patients with OHD. Lastly, free T4 was significantly higher in BMIF of patients with PCD and patients with OHD. Similar results were demonstrated in a separate analysis performed in patients with multiple myeloma. To conclude, the chemical and thyroid hormone composition of BMIF differs significantly from plasma in several key constituents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-450
Number of pages6
JournalHematological Oncology
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

Keywords

  • bone marrow
  • hematological malignancies
  • interstitial fluid

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