Challenges in patients with diabetes: Improving clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention through EVOlving stent technology

Robert A. Byrne*, Shmuel Banai, Roisin Colleran, Antonio Colombo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Patients with diabetes have poorer outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention than patients without diabetes. The Cre8™ EVO drug-eluting stent (DES) has design features that aim to improve clinical outcomes in patients with diabetes. These include Abluminal Reservoir Technology - a proprietary polymer-free drug-release system consisting of reservoirs on the abluminal surface of the stent that control drug release and direct the drug exclusively towards the vessel wall - and the Amphilimus™ drug formulation, which enables enhanced drug-tissue permeation utilising fatty acid transport pathways. The latter is particularly advantageous in patients with diabetes, whose cell metabolism favours increased cellular uptake of fatty acid. Furthermore, evidence suggests that mTOR inhibitors (-limus drugs) utilised in conventional DES are less effective in diabetic cells. The new stent architecture provides high device deliverability and conformability, facilitating clinical use in complex disease patterns and high-risk lesion morphologies. Clinical evidence for the efficacy and safety of the Cre8™ DES in patients with diabetes has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials and observational registries. These data are reviewed herein, along with an overview of on-going randomised trials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-44
Number of pages5
JournalInterventional Cardiology: Reviews, Research, Resources
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Diabetes
  • Drug-eluting stent
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Challenges in patients with diabetes: Improving clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention through EVOlving stent technology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this