Cardioprotection from stress conditions by weak magnetic fields in the Schumann Resonance band

G. Elhalel, C. Price, D. Fixler, A. Shainberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Schumann Resonances (ScR) are Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) electromagnetic resonances in the Earth-ionosphere cavity excited by global lightning discharges. This natural electromagnetic noise has likely existed on the Earth ever since the Earth had an atmosphere and an ionosphere, hence surrounding us throughout our evolutionary history. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of extremely weak magnetic fields in the ScR first mode frequency range on the spontaneous contractions, calcium transients and Creatine Kinase (CK) release of rat cardiac cell cultures. We show that applying 7.8 Hz, 90 nT magnetic fields (MF) causes a gradual decrease in the spontaneous calcium transients’ amplitude, reaching 28% of the initial amplitude after 40 minutes of MF application, and accompanied with a gradual decrease in the calcium transients’ rise time. The mechanical spontaneous contractions cease after the ScR fields have been applied for more than 30 minutes, when the calcium transient’s amplitude reached ~60% of its initial value. The influence of the ScR MF was reversible, independent of the field magnitude in the range 20 pT-100 nT, and independent of the external DC magnetic field. However, the effect is frequency dependent; the described changes occurred only in the 7.6–8 Hz range. In addition, applying 7.8 Hz, 90 nT MF for 1.5 hours, reduced the amount of CK released to the buffer, during normal conditions, hypoxic conditions and oxidative stress induced by 80 μM H 2 O 2 . We show that the ScR field induced reduction in CK release is associated with a stress response process and has a protective character.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1645
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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