Cardiac and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality associated with antipsychotic medications in elderly psychiatric inpatients

Yoram Barak, Yehuda Baruch, Doron Mazeh, Diana Paleacu, Dov Aizenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the rate of adverse medical outcomes for elderly exposed to antipsychotic treatment. METHODS: This was a retrospective evaluation of psychiatric inpatients records. Age, gender, diagnosis, treatment with antipsychotics, and duration of treatment were analyzed. An acute cardiac or cerebrovascular event necessitating transfer to a general hospital or resulting in death was the outcome measure. Results: During 15 years (1990 to 2005), 3,111 elderly were hospitalized. Their mean age was 73.5 ± 6.1 years, 1,220 were male (39%), and 1,891 were female (61%). Most patients (2,583 [83%]) were exposed to antipsychotics, of which 1,402 (54%) were exposed to second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs). Antipsychotic-treated patients did not have a higher rate of adverse medical outcomes compared with patients who had not received antipsychotics. No significant differences were noted between patients exposed to typical antipsychotics or SGAs. Conclusion: Treatment of elderly psychiatric inpatients with antipsychotics did not increase their risk of adverse medical outcomes. Thus, regulating the use of conventional antipsychotics or SGAs for all elderly patients in all indications may be premature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)354-356
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antipsychotic
  • Cardiac
  • Cerebrovascular
  • Elderly
  • Morbidity
  • Mortality

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