Can born approximate the unborn? A new validity criterion for the born approximation in microscopic imaging

Sigal Trattner*, Micha Feigin, Hayit Greenspan, Nir Sochen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalConference articlepeer-review

Abstract

The Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy is of widespread use for observing live biological specimens. In fertility clinics the DIC microscope is used for evaluating human embryo cells. An image formation model for DIC imaging is needed for reconstruction and quantification of the visualized specimens. This calls for a complicated analysis of the interaction of light waves with biological matter. Most works express the solution via the first Born approximation, yet a theoretical bound is known that limits the validity of such approximation to very small objects. We show in this work that the theoretical bound is not directly relevant to microscopic imaging and is far too limiting. We derive a more realistic bound and show that it may justify in many cases the use of the Born approximation in biological cell microscopic imaging. It also provides limits on the validity of the Born expansion that several works violate.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4409175
JournalProceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Event2007 IEEE 11th International Conference on Computer Vision, ICCV - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Duration: 14 Oct 200721 Oct 2007

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