Brightness contrast-contrast induction model predicts assimilation and inverted assimilation effects

Yuval Barkan, Hedva Spitzer, Shmuel Einav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In classical assimilation effects, intermediate luminance patches appear lighter when their immediate surround is comprised of white patches and appear darker when their immediate surround is comprised of dark patches. With patches either darker or lighter than both inducing patches, the direction of the brightness effect is reversed and termed as "inverted assimilation effect." Several explanations and models have been suggested, some are relevant to specific stimulus geometry, anchoring theory, and models that involve high level cortical processing (such as scission, etc.). None of these studies predicted the various types of assimilation effects and their inverted effects. We suggest here a compound brightness model, which is based on contrast-contrast induction (second-order adaptation mechanism). The suggested model predicts the various types of brightness assimilation effects and their inverted effects. The model is composed of three main stages: (1) composing post-retinal second-order opponent receptive .elds, (2) calculations of local and remote contrast, and (3) adaptation of the second-order (contrast-contrast induction). We also utilize a variation of the Jacobi iteration process to enable elegant edge integration in order to evaluate the model is performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number27
JournalJournal of Vision
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 17 Oct 2008

Keywords

  • Assimilation
  • Brightness
  • Computational model
  • Contrast gain control
  • Contrast-contrast induction
  • Inverted assimilation

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