Blood pressure dynamics after pubertal suppression with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs followed by estradiol treatment in transgender female adolescents: A pilot study

Liat Perl, Erella Elkon-Tamir, Anat Segev-Becker, Galit Israeli, Avivit Brener, Asaf Oren*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The benefits of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues (GnRHa) in the treatment of central precocious puberty are well established, and their use is regarded as both safe and effective. Possible adverse effects on blood pressure (BP) and cardiac outcomes, body composition, bone health and brain development, however, continue to be of some concern. The aim of this study was to analyze BP changes in transgender female adolescents before and after receiving GnRHa and after adding estrogen treatment. Methods: This was a retrospective pilot study. We analyzed systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) before and after GnRHa initiation and after adding estrogen. Results: Nineteen transgender female adolescents received GnRHa and 15 continued to estrogen treatment. Their baseline SBP and DBP percentiles did not change significantly after either GnRHa or the addition of estrogen treatment. Conclusions: Blood pressure is apparently not affected by GnRHa or GnRHa + estrogen treatment in transgender female adolescents. Further larger studies are indicated to confirm these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)741-745
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume34
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Gender dysphoria
  • Gender-affirming hormone treatment
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog
  • Transgender female adolescents

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