Bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularization related to inflammatory diseases

Michal Kramer, Ruth Axer-Siegel, Tareq Jaouni, Ehud Reich, Itzhak Hemo, Ethan Priel, Edward Averbukh, Rita Ehrlich, Itay Chowers, Dov Weinberger, Radgonde Amer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE:: The purpose of this study was to report our experience with intravitreal bevacizumab for inflammation-related choroidal neovascularization in two tertiary centers. METHODS:: This study was a retrospective analysis of patients with choroidal neovascularization related to inflammatory diseases, treated with intravitreal bevacizumab injections (1.25 mg/0.05 mL). RESULTS:: Ten eyes of 10 patients (range, 14-78 years; mean age, 44 years) with underlying uveitis were treated with intravitreal bevacizumab for inflammation-related choroidal neovascularization from 2006 to 2008. Mean follow-up time was 13 ± 8 months, and the mean number of injections was 2.7 ± 2. Resolved leakage on fluorescein angiography and resolution of subretinal fluid on optical coherence tomography occurred in all patients, with improvement in visual acuity in 9 of 10 eyes and no change in visual acuity in 1 of 10 eyes. Seven patients received additional treatment based on the underlying condition. Mean macular thickness on optical coherence tomography decreased from 394 ± 116 μm to 254 ± 52 μm (P < 0.01). Mean visual acuity improved from 0.87 ± 0.74 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution to 0.38 ± 0.63 (P = 0.005). Seven patients reached a visual acuity of 0.2 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (Snellen 6/9) or better. CONCLUSION:: Intravitreal bevacizumab is an effective treatment for choroidal neovascularization related to inflammatory diseases when inflammation is controlled.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)938-944
Number of pages7
JournalRetina
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bevacizumab for choroidal neovascularization related to inflammatory diseases'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this