Behavioural knowledge for policy design: The connection between time use Behaviours and (or) desires and support for policy alternatives

Lihi Lahat*, Itai Sened

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study explored how understanding people's behaviours and desires can inform policy design and contribute to policy feedback theory. We focused on uses of time that are affected by diverse policies. Given the growing interest in promoting well-being and the connection between the use of time and well-being, we examined behaviours and desires regarding uses of time. In this exploratory study, we employed a quantitative research method. We surveyed 671 Israeli adults on their time use, desires for time use, and support for policy alternatives in three policy fields: work, education, and welfare. In five out of 11 policy alternatives, we found a connection between behavioural variables and support for policy alternatives. While exploratory, our findings contribute innovative insights into the connection between behavioural variables and support for policy alternatives related to time use. Theoretically, the article highlights the importance of incorporating behavioural ‘signalling knowledge’ as an essential input at the policy design stage and contributes to the policy feedback literature on multidisciplinary policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)385-403
Number of pages19
JournalSocial Policy and Administration
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Funding

FundersFunder number
National Insurance Institute of Israel

    Keywords

    • behaviours
    • knowledge
    • perceptions
    • policy feedback
    • time

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