Basic fibroblast growth factor enhances the capacity of bone marrow cells to form bone-like nodules in vitro

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Abstract

The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the proliferation and differentiation of rat bone marrow cells in culture was studied. bFGF stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation into these cells by 4-fold at a concentration of 0.3 ng/ml and half-maximal effect was observed at a concentration of 15 pg/ml. In addition to its mitogenic effect, bFGF stimulated alkaline phosphatase activity by 3.6-fold. Continuous treatment with bFGF (for 21 days) resulted in a 6.3-fold increase in the culture dish surface area covered by bone-like mineralized tissue. Maximal bone-like tissue formation was observed in the presence of 3 ng/ml bFGF with half-maximal effect at a concentration of 0.3 ng/ml. These results indicate the possible role of bFGF in the proliferation of osteogenic rat bone marrow cells and their differentiation into cells of osteoblast-like phenotype.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)619-621
Number of pages3
JournalFEBS Letters
Volume250
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Jul 1989

Keywords

  • (Rat bone marrow)
  • Alkaline phosphatase
  • Fibroblast growth factor
  • Mineralized nodule
  • Osteogenesis in vitro

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