Bacterial Resistance to Cephalosporin Treatment in Elderly Stable Patients Hospitalized With a Urinary Tract Infection

Zvi Shimoni, Mohamed Salah, Amrani Kasem, Vered Hermush, Paul Froom*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: It is unclear if parenteral cephalosporin treatment is appropriate in stable elderly patients hospitalized with a urinary tract infection (UTI) in settings with a high prevalence of bacterial resistant organisms. Methods: We selected 934 consecutive stable patients aged ≥65 years with a UTI, 94.4% (n = 882) treated with a parenteral cephalosporin. Patients were divided into those with and without bacterial resistance to initial antibiotic therapy (BRIAT). Outcome measures were response to antibiotic therapy at 72 hours, prolonged hospitalization (>5 days) and mortality. Results: There were 316 patients (33.8%) with BRIAT. At 72 hours, 33.9% (107/316) did not respond to initial treatment. The odds of a prolonged hospitalization was 2.1 (95% confidence interval–1.6-2.9), but no patient with BRIAT died from urosepsis (0%, 95% confidence interval–0-1.2%). Conclusions: In elderly stable patients hospitalized with a UTI, treatment with a parenteral cephalosporin might be appropriate despite a high prevalence of resistant organisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-247
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume360
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • Bacterial resistance
  • Cephalosporins
  • Elderly
  • Hospitalized
  • Urinary tract infection

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Bacterial Resistance to Cephalosporin Treatment in Elderly Stable Patients Hospitalized With a Urinary Tract Infection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this