Avoidance of Coronary Angiography in High-Risk Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes: The ACSIS Registry Findings

Ronen Jaffe, Basheer Karkabi, Ilan Goldenberg, Nir Shlomo, Dina Vorobeichik, Barak Zafrir, Avinoam Shiran, Salim Adawi, Zaza Iakobishvili, Roy Beigel, Ronen Rubinshtein, Moshe Y. Flugelman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background/purpose: Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at high-risk for recurrent coronary syndromes, heart failure and death. Early coronary intervention combined with medications reduces these risks. The ACS Israeli Survey (ACSIS) is conducted over a 2-month period, every 2–3 years. ACSIS includes all patients discharged with a diagnosis of ACS from the 24 coronary care units and cardiology departments in Israel. We compared clinical profiles and 1-year survival between ACS patients who did and did not undergo coronary angiography. Methods/materials: We reviewed ACSIS for the period 2002–2013. Results: The prognosis of patients who did not undergo coronary angiography during hospitalization (N = 2078) was significantly worse than for patients who underwent angiography (N = 9550). Avoidance of angiography was less common in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients than in non-STEMI/unstable angina (NSTEMI/UAP) patients (13% vs. 22%, p < 0.001). Among NSTEMI/UAP patients, those who did not undergo angiography were older (mean: 71 vs. 64 years, p < 0.001), had higher incidences of diabetes (47% vs. 38%, p < 0.001), and renal (55% vs. 27%, p < 0.001) and heart failure (35% vs. 13%, p < 0.01) on admission, compared to those who underwent angiography. Even patients that underwent only diagnostic angiography had had a better prognosis than patients who did not undergo angiography. After propensity score matching for the major differences mentioned above, survival was still significantly better for patients who underwent angiography. Conclusion: ACS patients who did not undergo coronary angiography had higher-risk clinical profiles and worse 1-year survival than ACS patients who underwent angiography. After propensity score matching, the absence of angiography was independently associated with higher mortality. Data over 10 years were reviewed from a national registry of acute coronary syndrome. Patients who did not undergo coronary angiography during hospitalization were older and with more comorbidities than patients who underwent angiography. After propensity score matching, the absence of angiography remained independently associated with 1-year mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1230-1236
Number of pages7
JournalCardiovascular Revascularization Medicine
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • 1-Year mortality
  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Coronary angiography

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